Info on how, where and when you can get CIRCLES:

In Ghana, CIRCLES will be in Silverbird and Airport Shell within the next week or so. But before then, you can call the following people for a copy:

Nana Akuoko Glover – 0244-724-007

Albert Anim – 0244-774-992

Simon Mills – 0241-225-042

Outside Ghana, CIRCLES is now available on Amazon. Just type in Circles by Boakyewaa Glover or click the links below:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=circles+by+boakyewaa+glover

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Circles+by+boakyewaa+glover

                                   CIRCLES_Cover

       'Excursions in My Mind' Book Club

Writing and publishing a book is an arduous process. It’s also a personally rewarding experience. For me, the greatest part of it all is the incredible support I have received from family and friends (even people I have never met before).

Nana Awere Damoah is one of those people that I’ve never met but feel like I know pretty well. Nana Damoah published his book Excursions in my Mind over a year ago. He did the launch last December (2008) and since then he has been on a roll. His second book, ‘Through the Gates of Thought’ comes out next year.

Nana and I have a lot in common. We’re both Ghanaians, with non-writing jobs but still pursing our passion. We both published with the same company. Nana was actually the one who introduced me to Athena Press. After a year or so of supporting each other and comparing notes, I felt it would be really cool for Nana and I to interview each other and share our experiences as new Ghanaian writers.

Enjoy the interview!

CIRCLES 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Epiphany

The weather was so humid and tepid I felt stuffed and boxed in. My two-bedroom, 1,100-square-foot apartment had suddenly become strangely constricting. I wasn’t feeling like myself and it wasn’t just about the weather. I paced up and down, almost as if I was on a manhunt and, any second now, I would find excitement hidden somewhere. There was nothing interesting on TV and, as a TV addict, that was a major setback. There was actually never anything interesting on TV on Fridays. I had always wondered if there was some mysterious industry logic behind it. In any case, it left me completely bored senseless. My next addiction, the cinema, wasn’t any help either. I had been to the cinema a couple of hours before, so that option was done. I desperately needed to do something. My phone rang as I lay on my bed going mental with boredom. I looked at the number and answered excitedly.

  

Three Weeks

She couldn’t peel her eyes away even if she tried. She reached out and touched the lace embroidery gently. Her fingers slowly traced each line, each sparkling sequin all the way down to the tightly cinched waist line. She took a deep breath and circled the dress, gazing speechlessly at the beaded motif chapel train. This was it. She was really doing this.

“Did you find it? Did you find it?”

Carly looked over the mannequin at her best friend Adjo.

“This is just stunning. I have never seen anything like this before. Look at the detail on this, the hem, the bodice, right here on the back. I’m actually getting a little excited.”

Adjo laughed and hugged her friend.

“Thank God! We’ve been looking for months. I thought you were being difficult and picky on purpose.”

Carly sighed and clasped her hands nervously.

“I just want everything to be perfect, to be just right.”

“Come on, let’s go find a sales associate and get you inside your dream dress!”

Carly hugged Adjo tightly, tears in her eyes.

“I guess this is really happening.  It’s been so long.”

Adjo hugged her back.

“You deserve all of it.”

“There was an accident at the clinic.”

Nimako swung around to look at his father.

“Tendai? Is she okay? Did she do something?”

Nana Nimako stood up from the sofa and closed the door to the living room. He had begun spending more time with his son and his family, and had sort of moved in temporarily. This was a difficult time for all of them and his son needed him even more now. Nimako couldn’t talk to his wife, children or friends. His father was his only confidant now. Nana also needed his son. In all his years, nothing had ever terrified him this much. When his wife died, he had been terrified of living without her, but this was much worse.

Tendai drove fast straight home, barely conscious of the road but weaving through the traffic with an experienced ease. She was frustrated at Nana, and angry she was not getting the answers she needed.  She knew she could dig deep into his head and rip all those memories and answers out, but each time she entered his head, he grimaced in pain. He was old, getting everything she needed could kill him. As angry as she was, it was a risk she couldn’t take yet. She had to find answers, somehow, some other way.

As soon as she saw her mother’s car in the driveway, her face tightened and she clenched her fists. Fighting with someone like Nana who loved her had taken a toll. She was not in the mood to tussle with the woman who definitely had no love for her. She felt her mother’s presence in the kitchen so she went round the house and entered through the back door straight to her room. She slammed the door hard behind her and lay on her bed, staring at the ceiling. She needed to think, she needed to put things in perspective. She felt tired, drained and lonely. She’d known she was different all her life. But now there was a renewed need to find out more. She glanced at the family portrait again. It was time, wasn’t it? It was time to rattle some cages, and see what falls out. Something had to. She closed her eyes and eventually fell asleep.